CFP – Star Trek Novel Worlds, deadline Oct 31, 2019

CFP: Call for proposals for ​Strange Novel Worlds? Star Trek Novels and Fiction Collections in Popular Culture

216645

 

Since James Blish published his novelizations of Star Trek episodes (Bantam, 1967sq), over 840 tie-in novels, anthologies, novelizations, and omnibus editions have made their way to fans eager to follow the continuing adventures of their favourite Starfleet officers and aliens. Though none are to be considered canon, Star Trek tie-in books have supplemented the franchise, providing more stories starring favourite and original characters, furthering plotlines and helping to tide fans over in the years between series and movies. Their authors too have sought out new life and new civilizations.

Tie-in novels have had a significant influence on Star Trek fandom, especially on fan-fiction, providing in-depth biographical and psychological information on beloved characters. In a fundamental way, these books have shaped the way fans understand Star Trek; these authors stand as nearly equal builders of the Star Trek franchise as Gene Roddenberry, his producers, and the creators and producers of later incarnations. For example, character details of William Rostler’s, Diane Duane’s and Vonda N. McIntyre’s novels have since been canonized, such as McIntyre coining Hikaru Sulu’s first name (The Entropy Effect ​ , Simon & Shuster, 1981). Della van Hise’s ​Killing Time, and the scandal surrounding the heavy homosexual subtext of its first printing (Simon & Shuster, 1985), helped cement the foundational fanfictional slash pairing of Kirk and Spock, one that had previously mostly existed in the underground of fandom.

We invite researchers to send 300-700 word essay proposals, due before 30 October 2019. We anticipate final essays of about 8000 words relating to Star Trek tie-in fiction, including but not limited to the following:

 

  • The episode and film novelizations and similar para-canonical fictions;
  • The ​New Voyages (Bantam, 1976, 1978), ​Strange New Worlds (Simon & Shuster,         1998-2016);
  • The relationship(s) between the novels and fans, the novels as source parallel to canon;
  • Della van Hise’s ​Killing Time ​ (Simon & Shuster, 1985, 1986);
  • Studies of any author, including but not limited to Diane Duane, David Gerrold, Vonda N. McIntyre,  A. C. Crispin, John M. Ford, Della van Hise, Peter David​;
  • Studies of any specific series or novels;
  • The children’s/YA novels and novelizations;
  • Genres and genre boundaries in the Star Trek novels;
  • Representation of gender(s), gender metaphors;
  • Representations of race, Humans and non-Humans, race metaphors;
  • Translations into languages other than English; the original German tie-in books;
  • Other related topics.

Please send proposals and a short bio, including contact information, to           stnovelsbook@gmail.com​ by 31 October 2019.

Caroline-Isabelle Caron,  History Department, Cultural Studies Programme, Queen’s University, Kingston

Kristin Noone, English Department, Irvine Valley College

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CFP -Series Books & Science Fiction – special session National PCA Conference

Call for Papers: Series Books and Science Fiction (National PCA Conference)

 

This call for papers for the national PCA Conference looks to interrogate the intersection of two distinct genres: juvenile series books and science fiction.

Scholars of children’s literature note important generic, structural, and cultural definitions in regards to series books. Series books are dominated by static natures. The central character—usually a flat, unchanging trope more than a fully realized, fleshed out, dynamic figure—is likewise a static creation. Often, these characters do not even age, let alone change. Typified by series like Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, “a Dixon or a Keene promised a reliably pat formula, a single general story in which only the details of the mystery differed from book to book” (Karell 37). These generic conventions have been simply described as, “Good mystery and lots of action, with some educational material” (Herz 8). While the “educational material” could be information about the places the characters visited or the objects encountered during the story—apt for any mystery set in an exotic clime—the “action” was always to be “tension without violence” (Herz 12). In the series, “tension is created through the possibility that something catastrophic may happen” (Herz 12, italics original). It was considered vital that the books contained nothing prurient or off-color, and even the sanitized ‘violence’ involved no blood. It is true that the boys and the villains repeatedly got tied up, hit on the head, or nearly drowned, and that they tumbled down cliffs or fell through trapdoors, but they never died brutal deaths…by the standards of the late twentieth century, the series books were remarkably tame and included no tobacco and not the slightest hint of sex, even on the part of the villains. (Greenwald 36)

Reflecting strict dictates regarding violence, sexuality, patriarchy, and social hierarchy, these books were ultimately intended to reflect “good, wholesome adventure and suspense” that did not, in any way, disrupt the status quo (Herz 13).

Science fiction is another distinct genre. At its core, the nomenclature of “science fiction” itself is something of a paradox. “Fiction” denotes fantasy, fancy, that which is divorced from “reality.” Certainly fiction has always spoke to and explored what is considered to be real or reality, but in its very construction one sees the seeds for a departure from the tangible and into realms that exist beyond this real world. “Science,” however, suggests a specific discipline grounded in reality, based on predictable principles of action and inaction. Science is the study of the physical world in all its varied manifestations; it relies on observation, experimentation, and the judicious recording and interpretation of reality and fact. The two together, then, create that aforementioned oxymoron: “science fiction,” which, for all intents and purposes, could be translated into “real unreality.” Science fiction constructs its possibilities from what is real, from what is possible, or conceivably so. The fact that science fiction and its most common manifestations—space flight, technology, alien realms—are so connected to the future, and to our visions and re-visions of the future, suggests that the genre is concerned not with what is unreal, but rather with what may be real, or may soon be real. The flights of fancy that govern science fiction are grounded in the tangible, in the realm of what is possible, real, hoped for, and feared.

These two divergent genres do interact. Certain volumes in series like Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys contain distinctly science fiction elements; other series like Tom Swift and Rick Brant have elements of science fiction throughout the series. Modern children’s sci fi series like Masterminds, Pierce Brown’s Red Rising books and Scott Westerfield’s Horizon series also bring the two genres together. The papers in this panel will explore that interactivity, to examine how two very divergent genres both work together and clash in the creation of story.

 

Submission Guidelines: In Word (.doc/.docx), Rich Text Format (.rtf), or PDF, 250-word proposals for individual papers should be submitted through the PCA website and only through the PCA website. Please submit to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Area (the panels will be coordinated between the Science Fiction and Fantasy area and the Children’s/Young Adult Series Books and Dime Novels area). Instructions for submission can be found at www.pcaaca.org/conference/instructions.php and submissions made at http://ncp.pcaaca.org.

 

Submissions can be made on the site after 1 August 2019.

 

The abstract document should contain the following information, in this order:

  • Name of presenter—indicate main contact person if submitting a multi-authored paper
  • Institutional affiliation—if applicable
  • Name and contact information of Supervising professor—for undergraduate students only
  • Address(es), telephone number(s), and current email address(es) of presenter(s)
  • Title of paper
  • Indicate that it is for the “Series Books and Science Fiction” panels

Followed by the 250-word proposal(s)

 

The proposal will be acknowledged within 2 days of its receipt, and the sender will be notified of the submission’s status no later than 15th November 2019. Please be aware that acknowledgment of receipt does not automatically denote acceptance. Deadlines for submission are firm, and we cannot accept any papers made after the deadline. Earlier submission is appreciated.

 

Please, do not simultaneously submit proposals to multiple areas. Doing so is a discourtesy to area chairs and will result in your paper being refused. Per PCA/ACA guidelines, a person may present only one paper at the annual meeting, regardless of subject area. If you try to submit to two areas, the master program will not accept your proposals (which may result in your paper not being accepted in either area).

 

Send content questions to Michael Cornelius at mcornelius@wilson.edu.

 

Submission Deadline: 1 November 2019

 

 

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SFF Area Survey – 2019

In order to find out how our conference and area are doing, we have created this very short survey, and ask that anyone who attended or is interested in the area to fill it out.

Thanks from the Area Chairs – Gillian, Sherry and Heather!!!

SFF Area survey!

 

 

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CFP – Women and Language

Call for Papers | Women & Language

Editor: Leland G. Spencer, PhD | Miami University

 

            Women & Language, an international, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal publishes original scholarly articles and creative work covering all aspects of communication, language, and gender. Contributions to Women & Language may be empirical, rhetorical-critical, interpretive, theoretical, or artistic. All appropriate research methodologies are welcome.

Affiliated with the Organization for the Study of Communication, Language, and Gender, the journal espouses an explicitly feminist positionality, though articles need not necessarily engage or advance feminist theory to be appropriate fits for the journal, and articles that critically examine feminisms are welcome. Other potential topics include but are not limited to studies of human communication in dyads, families, groups, organizations, and social movements; analyses of public address, media texts, literature, activism, and other cultural phenomena; the role of gender in verbal and nonverbal communication, intercultural exchanges, listening, relationship building, and public advocacy; linguistic analysis; and many others. The journal operates from a nuanced and expansive understanding of gender, so contributions about sexuality, gender identity, and the complexity and limitations of gender as a concept are especially appropriate. Contributions that center intersectional perspectives are particularly encouraged, as are those that explore gender and language from non-Western or global perspectives. Articles published in Women & Language need not come from a communication perspective, but should reflect thoughtful engagement with language and/or communication processes or theory.

Submissions are welcome from scholars, students, activists, and practitioners at any stage of their careers. All submissions undergo rigorous peer review in a mentorship-centered process committed to developing excellent scholarship.

 

To submit, email Leland G. Spencer at editorwomenandlanguage@gmail.com.

  • All submissions to Women & Language should be electronically submitted in a Word file.
  • Articles should be prepared in standard American written English.
  • Preferred length for scholarly research and theory manuscripts is 6,000-10,000 words including endnotes and references; a 150-word abstract and 4-5 keywords should accompany submissions. Creative submissions may be shorter.
  • Preferred font is Times New Roman; following these guidelines will help in the retention of formatting.
  • Any accompanying graphic needs to be at least 500kb file size with a resolution of at least 150 pixels per inch. Authors are responsible for securing permission to reprint images, lengthy quotations, and other copyrighted material.
  • Prepare materials with no author identification on the manuscript itself, including in the Word metadata; otherwise, submissions should adhere to the sixth edition of the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual. Please note that APA style requires DOI numbers for all digital references.
  • Articles for general issues are accepted on a rolling basis, with initial decisions typically issued in about 3 months.
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PCA 2020 Philadelphia – Call for proposals SFF Area

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY AREA

Conference of the Popular and American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

15-18 April 2020 – Philadelphia, PA

 

One of the largest and most vibrant of the association, the Science Fiction and Fantasy (SF/F) Area invites proposals for its 2020 national conference to be held at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, PA. The goals of our area are (1) to share and support research, scholarship, and publication and (2) to mentor emerging scholars. As a result, we invite proposals from professors, independent scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates (with the approval / guidance of their professors).

 

PCA/ACA SF/F welcomes any theoretical or (inter)disciplinary approach to any topic related to SF/F:  art; literature; radio; film; television; comics and graphic novels; video, role-playing, and multi-player online games.  We plan to hold joint sessions with the Romance Area and the Dime Novels and Series Books Area in 2020. If your SF/F interests intersect with those, then by all means submit a proposal. We will have more information about those joint sessions soon.

 

Submission Guidelines:  In Word (.doc/.docx), Rich Text Format (.rtf), or PDF, 250-word proposals for individual papers should be submitted through the PCA website and only through the PCA website. If you wish to submit a panel for the conference, all presenters must submit individually through the website, and then notify the Area Chairs of your intention to present together. Please do not include panel colleagues on the electronic submission as this confuses the program.  Instructions for submission can be found at www.pcaaca.org/conference/instructions.php and submissions made at http://ncp.pcaaca.org .

 

Submissions can be made on the site after 1 August 2019.

 

The document should contain the following information in this order:

 

    • Name of presenter—indicate main contact person if submitting a multi-authored paper
    • Institutional affiliation—if applicable

 

  • Name and contact information of Supervising professor—undergraduates only

 

    • Address(es), telephone number(s), and current email address(es) of presenter(s)
    • Title of paper

 

  • 250-word proposal(s)

 

 

Roundtables and special sessions can only be created by Area Chairs—if you wish to organize one of these sessions, please contact the Area Chairs, who will create the event for you in the schedule. Note that ALL areas are limited in the number of roundtables that can be held: two. If you wish to propose one, then do so as soon as possible, as we already have one scheduled for 2020.

The proposal will be acknowledged within 2 days of its receipt, and the sender will be notified of the submission’s status no later than 15th November 2019.  Please be aware that acknowledgement of receipt does not automatically denote acceptance.  Deadlines for submission are firm, and we cannot accept any papers made after the deadline.  Earlier submission is appreciated.

 

Please, do not simultaneously submit proposals to multiple areas. Doing so is a discourtesy to area chairs and will result in your paper being refused. Per PCA/ACA guidelines, a person may present only one paper at the annual meeting, regardless of subject area. If you try to submit to two areas, the master program will not accept your proposals (which may result in your paper not being accepted in either area).

 

 

Submission Deadline:  1 November 2019

 

Each year the SF/F Area hosts a fundraising event that includes a film, snacks, and a prize raffle of DVDs, novels, academic books, action figures, etc.—thousands of dollars in merchandise. Come enjoy the food, friendship, and fun! This year’s movie will be a science fiction film, The Philadelphia Experiment. Fundraising supports area activities and a cash award to the best student paper. Beginning in 2020 we will institute two new awards: student travel and junior faculty / independent scholar travel.  More details about these awards can be found at the area’s website: www.pcasff.wordpress.com. We do accept donations of items for the raffle, so if your shelves are starting to bulge under all of your SF/F memorabilia, ask yourself if you really need 3 Thor action figures. If not, then donate that stuff to us.

 

Please be aware that the PCA offers several (highly competitive) travel bursaries and deadlines for them are 1 November 2019.  Check the PCA website www.pcaaca.org for more information.

 

Hope to see you in Philadelphia!

 

Gillian I Leitch, Sherry Ginn and Heather M Porter

PCA/ACA SF/F Area Chairs

 

 

 

Direct all enquiries to our email address. Gillian responds to email via this address:   pcasff@gmail.com

 

NOTE: While the PCA/ACA welcomes fresh approaches to subjects, serious commitment to scholarship and to presenting at the conference is expected.

 

Please note that this is a professional conference and once you are accepted, your presentation becomes integral to the success of the event.  If you must cancel, please notify the Area Chairs of your withdrawal as soon as you know.  Failure to do so will impact future opportunities to present at this conference.

 

Next year’s conference will commence early Wednesday morning. Be advised that your panel will be assigned a time randomly by the master scheduler. We cannot change the schedule after it is completed, so please ensure that you will be able to attend the entire conference before you submit your proposal. In other words, clear your schedule from Wednesday through Saturday. We will notify you of your exact presentation time as soon as we can, but the final program is not likely to be completed before 20 January 2020. You have to register for the conference by the 1st of January 2020, otherwise your paper will be dropped from the schedule.  Make your hotel reservations as soon as possible. The number of reserved rate hotel rooms is limited; you can always cancel a reservation (by the date dictated by the hotel) but you cannot make a reservation after the room block is full.

 

Please consult our handy guide for proposing here:

https://pcasff.wordpress.com/a-guide-to-academic-and-professional-conferences-or-how-not-to-be-killed-or-ridiculed-by-your-colleagues/

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PCA Deadlines for the 2020 conference

August 1, 2019               Submission Page Goes Live

October 1, 2019             Early Bird Registration Opens

November 1, 2019         Deadline for Paper Proposals

November 1, 2019         Endowment Grants Deadline

December 1, 2019          Early Bird Registration ENDS

January 1, 2020              Regular Registration ENDS

January 2, 2020              Late Registration BEGINS—be sure to reserve your spot in the                                                   program!

January 15, 2020            Brigman and Jones Awards Deadline

January 20, 2020            Preliminary Schedule Available

February 1, 2020           Registration for Presenters ENDS—participants who have not                                                   registered dropped from the program at the end of the day

February 15, 2020         SFF Area  Awards submission Deadline

FEBRUARY 2, 2020        REGISTRATION SYSTEM  CLOSES at Midnight

March 1, 2020                Non-Presenters Late Registration OPENS

April 15-18, 2020           Philly!

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CFP – Star Trek: Deep Space Nine – deadline 1 Oct 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

 

Sherry Ginn and Michael Cornelius, editors of the forthcoming Serializing the Apocalypse:  Essays on the Never-Ending End of the World, announce their intent to publish a new collection of essays about Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Although this series ended twenty years ago this year, a stand-alone examination of the series has not been published to date. On air from 1993-1999, DS9 was a departure from The Next Generation’s depiction of the United Federation of Planets’ diplomatic and scientific study of the Alpha Quadrant. Situated on a space station at the entrance of a wormhole near the planet of Bajor, DS9’s stories revolved around the uneasy cease-fire between the Bajorans and the Cardassians as mediated by the Federation.  Different in style from the two previous incarnations of Star Trek, Deep Space Nine illustrated a future darker and more dystopian than the vision depicted in The Original Series and The Next Generation.

The following is a suggested list of topics, broadly stated, but the list is by no means exhaustive.

  • Patriotism vs Terrorism
  • Religion
  • Sex and Gender (including sexism and sexual harassment)
  • Identity
  • Family
  • Speciesism / Racism, including interspecies / interracial sex, romance, and procreation
  • Production (writing, editing, music, etc)
  • Fiction, published during the series’ run as well as that which continues the story of DS9, including fanfiction
  • DS9’s legacy

 

Deadline for formal proposals is 1 October 2019 with notification of acceptance by 1 December. A first draft is expected by 1 March 2020 with final drafts due 1 August 2020. This peer-reviewed collection is to be published by McFarland and Company, the leading publisher of popular culture texts in the United States.

Please email me at: DoctorGinn@gmail.com with your proposals and any questions you may have concerning the project. Please place the words “Deep Space Nine” in the subject line.

 

Sherry Ginn, PhD

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